Login  Register
HOMEPAGE Hot Web Links Write For Us Contact Us  
We Update Everyday                                    RANDOM ARTICLES HERE -------------- > > > > > > >

Another Collection of Fascinating Pictures From History



September 30th, 2014 by in History with 314 Views

Louis Boutan – One of the first underwater photographs which required a 30 minute exposure, 1893

historical photos

Khe Sanh, Vietnam, 1968

historical photos

The Battle of Khe Sanh began on January 21, 1968. For the next 77 days, U.S. Marines and their South Vietnamese allies fought off an intense siege of the garrison, in one of the longest and bloodiest battles of the Vietnam War. Meanwhile, with U.S. and South Vietnamese attention focused on Khe Sanh, North Vietnamese and Viet Cong forces launched the Tet Offensive. President Lyndon Johnson agreed with Genral Westmoreland’s(commander of the U.S. Military Assistance Command in Vietnam (MACV) argument that the base should be held at all costs, and U.S. and South Vietnamese forces launched Operation Niagara. Westermoreland had almost certainly fallen victim to the North Vietnamese diversionary tactic as the north Vietnamese built up forces in urban areas in the south and launched attacks in more than 100 cities and towns known as the Tet Offensive.

Unemployed lumber worker goes with his wife to the bean harvest. Note social security number tattooed on his arm, Oregon, 1939 by Dorothea Lange.

historical photos

Behind the scenes of the iconic image of Marilyn Monroe standing on the subway grate. On location in NYC, filming of Seven Year Itch, 195

historical photos

Joe DiMaggio was on the set and this scene pissed him off so much it led to their divorce.

John J. Wilpers Jr, a member of the Army Intelligence unit that had gone to arrest Hideki Tojo, the wartime Prime Minister of Japan, finds him slumped semiconcious after he tried to commit suicide by shooting himself through the heart, Tokyo, September 11, 1945

historical photos

Another View

Hideki Tojo was saved by US army doctors. He was later tried and convicted for war crimes and hanged  in December 1948.

After Japan’s unconditional surrender in 1945, U.S. general Douglas MacArthur issued orders for the arrest of the first forty alleged war criminals, including Tōjō. Soon, Tōjō’s home in Setagaya was besieged with newsmen and photographers. Three American GIs (Corporal Paul Korol, Private First Class John Potkul, and Private First Class James Safford) and two Office of Strategic Services (O.S.S.) Officers (one of whom was John J. Wilpers, Jr.) were sent to serve the arrest warrant on Tojo.

Two American war correspondents, Hugh Bailey and Russell Braun, had previously interviewed Tojo and were also present when the attempt was made to serve the arrest warrant. Inside, a doctor named Suzuki had marked Tōjō’s chest with charcoal to indicate the location of his heart. When American military police surrounded the house on September 8, 1945, they heard a muffled shot from inside. Major Paul Kraus and a group of military police burst in, followed by George Jones, a reporter for The New York Times. Tōjō had shot himself in the chest with a pistol, but despite shooting directly through the mark, the bullets missed his heart and penetrated his stomach. Now disarmed and with blood gushing out of his chest, Tōjō began to talk, and two Japanese reporters recorded his murmured words: “I am very sorry it is taking me so long to die. The Greater East Asia War was justified and righteous. I am very sorry for the nation and all the races of the Greater Asiatic powers. I wait for the righteous judgment of history. I wished to commit suicide but sometimes that fails.” -

A newspaper vendor posing with Union soldiers reading his wares in a Union camp in Virginia during the Civil War, 1863. By Alexander Gardner

historical photos

Reunion of Gettysburg veterans, 1913

historical photos

Mrs. Robert Kennedy tries to comfort her husband as he lays mortally wounded on the floor in the kitchen at the Ambassador Hotel. June 6, 1968

historical photos

- Vietnam Veterans Against the War, circa 1970

historical photos

Native American telephone switchboard operator, Helen of Many Glacier Hotel, June 1925

historical photos

U.S. Marines emerge from muddy foxholes after a third night of fighting against of NVA 324 B division troops during the Vietnam War on Sept. 21, 1966

historical photos

Kodak moment, Atlantic City, 1912

historical photos

A young West Berlin couple peer over the Wall as the woman speaks to her mother in East Berlin, 1960s

historical photos

Newly freed POWs in Vietnam celebrate during Operation Homecoming. As their plane lifts off from Hanoi, they know they are finally free

historical photos

The Statue of Liberty as seen from Jersey City in 1973. Looks like some sci-fi dystopia

historical photos

The Bowdoin College Tug of War Team, 1891

historical photos

Customers line up outside the first McDonald’s hamburger stand which was opened in 1948 by brothers Dick and Maurice McDonald in San Bernadino, California

historical photos

Horst Faas picture of Vietnamese and US troops rest after a tense night awaiting a Viet Cong ambush near the village of Binh Gia. January 1965

historical photos

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 1940 by Jack Delano

historical photos

A rush to retrieve gold from the bank before the Communist victory, Shanghai, China 1949

historical photos

Eduard Bloch, the Jewish physician of the Hitler family in his office c. 1938. Bloch was given special protection by the Gestapo during the Anschluss, and emigrated to the United States

historical photos

This was Hitler’s family physician growing up. This doctor did all he could while they were poor, and when Hitler’s mother had cancer. He kindly gave them discounts on medicine, and apparently didn’t charge them when they really needed it. He was supposedly quite fond of the family in general, and when the Holocaust and Nazi rise occurred, Dr Bloch and his wife were protected, and admitted to leave the country without harassment, even allowed to sell their home and a normal price. When Dr Bloch wrote to Hitler during the Anschluss, Hitler immediately responded by sending the Gestapo to make sure no harm came to the Blochs.